Post-NCAA Tournament Part 1

Oftentimes I get into debates arguments with people about which college or university has the best basketball program. These discussions generally stay within the realm of reason with the factors being: NCAA Championships, NCAA Tournament berths, Final Fours, total wins and sometimes first-round draft picks.

But sometimes things get off track when someone brings up the success of former players in the NBA. Personally I don’t think that has any place in the debate of best college programs, but it always gets me to thinking about what university puts out the best pros.

What I want to do is try to find a fairly definitive way of listing the current professional basketball players based on their universities to decide which one is best. This list is not one that covers all-time NBA players, rather it is about those who are currently playing. The first step of this exercise was to find the 12 schools that would field the best possible lineups of players that are professionals now.

Just to be clear, to be considered for this list you must meet only the following condition:

  • Be an active professional basketball player

After narrowing the list to twelve schools I decided the best way of deciding the best was creating a playoff bracket that would allow me to analyze the teams in a game-by-game fashion.

To determine a playoff I had to first come up with a way to rank the teams for seeding purposes. These ranks do not mean I believe the number one ranked team according to point total is the best one, only the number one seed in the tournament. To determine a team’s rank I came up with a formula determining a players value and subsequent team value.

The point system is as follows:

1. Points per game + rebounds per game + assists per game
2. Number of All-Star Games (3 points)
3. NBA Championships (10 points)
4. Number of Pro Seasons (1 point each)
5. Regular season MVP (10 points)
6. Finals MVP (9 points)
7. 6th Man of the Year/Defensive Player of the Year/Rookie of the Year (7 points)
8. Add up numbers 1-7 for player value
9. Add up players values for team value

For example: Brandon Roy: 38.5 points

  • 12.2 PPG/ 2.6 RPG/ 2.7 APG
  • 5 seasons
  • 3-time All-Star
  • Rookie of the Year

Notes:

∏ denotes stats from 2009-10 if the player was injured in 2010-11.

* denotes stats from college in 2010-11.

† denotes stats from a non-NBA league.

#12. Ohio St. Buckeyes: 104.5 points
Even before I put together the points for the Buckeyes I figured they would be at or near the bottom of the list. One of the stipulations for this list is that all the players would be healthy for this tournament. While Greg Oden has only played in two full seasons and Michael Redd has missed numerous games the past few seasons, they still have got enough game to easily make this team. Thad Matta is one heck of a recruiter to have three players from just one of his recruiting classes to make the Ohio St. active pro team. The strength of this team is two seven footers (Oden and Kosta Koufos) down low and three guards (Redd, Mike Conley Jr. and Daequan Cook) that can shoot lights out, especially when left open.

C- Greg Oden (∏), 7′ 0″ 285 lbs. – Portland Trail Blazers

  • 11.1 PPG/ 8.5 RPG/ .5 APG
  • 2 seasons

PF- Kosta Koufos, 7′ 0″ 265 lbs. – Denver Nuggets

  • 3.2 PPG/ 2.6 RPG/ .1 APG
  • 3 seasons

SF- Evan Turner, 6′ 7″ 205 lbs. – Philadelphia 76ers

  • 7.2 PPG/ 3.9 RPG/ 2.0 APG
  • 1 season

SG- Michael Redd, 6′ 6″ 215 lbs. – Milwaukee Bucks

  • 4.4 PPG/ .8 RPG/ 1.2 APG
  • 11 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

PG- Mike Conley Jr., 6′ 1″ 185 lbs. – Memphis Grizzlies

  • 13.7 PPG/ 3.0 RPG/ 6.5 APG
  • 4 seasons

6th Man- Daequan Cook, 6′ 5″ 210 lbs. – Oklahoma City Thunder

  • 5.6 PPG/ 1.7 RPG/ .5 APG
  • 4 seasons

#11. Syracuse Orange: 122 points

After Carmelo Anthony, pro talent is really lacking for the Orangemen. Jonny Flynn and Donte Greene’ have been slightly better than busts, Hakim Warrick is a serviceable role player, and Etan Thomas is just plain bad. We have all seen Anthony win a college tournament on his own before, but to succeed here the rest of his supporting cast has to be better. Not sure how far this squad can go.

C- Etan Thomas, 6′ 10″ 260 lbs. – Atlanta Hawks

  • 2.5 PPG/ 1.8 RPG/ .2 APG
  • 9 seasons

PF- Hakim Warrick, 6′ 9″ 219 lbs. – Phoenix Suns

  • 8.4 PPG/ 3.7 RPG/ .9 APG
  • 7 seasons

SF- Carmelo Anthony, 6′ 8″ 230 lbs. – New York Knicks

  • 25.6 PPG/ 7.3 RPG/ 2.9 APG
  • 8 seasons
  • 4-time All-Star

SG- Wes Johnson, 6′ 7″ 205 lbs. – Minnesota Timberwolves

  • 9.0 PPG/ 3.0 RPG/ 1.9 APG
  • 1 season

PG- Jonny Flynn, 6′ 0″ 185 lbs. – Houston Rockets

  • 5.3 PPG/ 1.5 RPG/ 3.4 APG
  • 2 seasons

6th Man- Donte’ Greene, 6′ 11″ 226 lbs. – Sacramento Kings

  • 5.8 PPG/ 2.1 RPG/ .7 APG
  • 3 seasons

#10. UCLA Bruins: 155.8

Rankings-wise this is a team that could and should be a little better. But, their low point total as a team is due mostly to the fact that they field such a young roster. Kevin Love had a breakout season last year raking in an absurd amount of rebounds, even having 30 points and 30 rebounds one game. Russell Westbrook is now a proven star that can take over games, and Aaron Afflalo is one heck of a shooter. The major liability here is at power forward with undersized Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, but he is much better than the alternative of Dan Gadzuric. Baron Davis would bolster the point total for UCLA and allow them to move up the rankings, but his play is no better than Darren Collison’s right now.

C- Kevin Love, 6′ 10″ 260 lbs. – Minnesota Timberwolves

  • 20.2 PPG/ 15.2 RPG/ 2.5 APG
  • 3 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

PF- Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, 6′ 8″ 230 lbs. – Milwaukee Bucks

  • 6.7 PPG/ 5.3 RPG/ .9 APG
  • 3 seasons

SF- Trevor Ariza, 6′ 8″ 210 lbs. – New Orleans Hornets

11.0 PPG/ 5.4 RPG/ 2.2 APG

  • 7 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship

SG- Aaron Afflalo, 6′ 5″ 215 lbs. – Denver Nuggets

  • 12.6 PPG/ 3.6 RPG/ 2.4 APG
  • 4 seasons

PG- Russell Westbrook, 6′ 3″ 187 lbs. – Oklahoma City Thunder

  • 21.9 PPG/ 4.6 RPG/ 8.2 APG
  • 3 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

6th Man- Darren Collison, 6′ 0″ 160 lbs. – Indiana Pacers

  • 13.2 PPG/ 2.8 RPG/ 5.1 APG
  • 2 seasons

#9. Florida Gators: 157.1

The NCAA Champion Florida Gators field 50% of the roster here with Joakim Noah, Al Horford and Corey Brewer. Noah and Horford are bona fide stars in the NBA right now while Brewer is no more than sixth or seventh option on any team, but on a roster with plenty of big men they need him. Nick Calathes was a college star who sought a higher earning potential in Greece and has excelled in his two seasons there, while Mike Miller is only on the roster due to a lack of talent elsewhere. David Lee, who would be a starter on most other rosters, is a great sixth man and beats out Udonis Haslem and Mareese Speights.

C- Joakim Noah, 6′ 11″ 232 lbs. – Chicago Bulls

  • 11.7 PPG/ 10.4 RPG/ 2.2 APG
  • 4 seasons

PF- Al Horford, 6′ 10″ 245 lbs. – Atlanta Hawks

  • 15.3 PPG/ 9.3 RPG/ 3.5 APG
  • 4 seasons
  • 2-time All-Star

SF- Corey Brewer, 6′ 9″ 188 lbs. – Dallas Mavericks

  • 8.0 PPG/ 2.5 RPG/ 1.3 APG
  • 4 seasons

SG- Mike Miller, 6′ 8″ 218 lbs. – Miami Heat

  • 5.6 PPG/ 4.5 RPG/ 1.2 APG
  • 11 seasons
  • 6th Man of the Year

PG- Nick Calathes (†), 6′ 6″ 195, Panathinaikos B.C.

  • 7.8 PPG/ 3.1 RPG/ 3.2 APG
  • 2 seasons
  • 1-time Greek All-Star
  • 1 Euroleague Championship

6th Man- David Lee, 6′ 9″ 240 lbs. – Golden State Warriors

  • 16.5 PPG/ 9.8 RPG/ 3.2 APG
  • 6 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

#8. Texas Longhorns: 166.2

This is a very intriguing team. Granted any team with the two-time defending scoring champion would be, but after Kevin Durant there is also one of the best up-and-coming big men in the league in LaMarcus Aldridge along with a trio of guards who can all handle the ball. Power forward is a liability here, but the backcourt and center should be able to shoulder the majority of the load.

C- LaMarcus Aldridge, 6′ 11″ 240 lbs. – Portland Trail Blazers

  • 21.8 PPG/ 8.8 RPG/ 2.1 APG
  • 5 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

PF- Damion James, 6′ 7″ 220 lbs. – New Jersey Nets

  • 4.4 PPG/ 3.4 RPG/ .8 APG
  • 1 season

SF- Kevin Durant, 6′ 9″ 230 lbs. – Oklahoma City Thunder

  • 27.7 PPG/ 6.8 RPG/ 2.2 APG
  • 4 seasons
  • 2-time All-Star
  • Rookie of the Year

SG- Daniel Gibson, 6′ 2″ 200 lbs. – Cleveland Cavaliers

  • 11.6 PPG/ 2.6 RPG/ 3.0 APG
  • 5 seasons

PG- D.J. Augustin, 6′ 0″ 180 lbs. – Charlotte Bobcats

  • 14.4 PPG/ 2.7 RPG/ 6.1 APG
  • 3 seasons

6th Man- T.J. Ford, 6′ 0″ 165 lbs. – Indiana Pacers

  • 5.4 PPG/ 2.0 RPG/ 3.4 APG
  • 7 seasons

#7. Kentucky Wildcats: 179.9

The Wildcats have a lot of NBA players, but none that are really considered superstars. Their biggest strength is easily at point guard with Rajon Rondo, John Wall, Eric Bledsoe and Brandon Knight all in the NBA. But only Rondo and Wall can make the team, and unfortunately neither can slide over to shooting guard since neither can shoot. Up front Kentucky boasts DeMarcus Cousins and the vastly underrated Chuck Hayes. At small forward Tayshaun Prince is a proven winner and necessary defender against the likes of Durant and Anthony. Jodie Meeks is the biggest weakness, but his sharp shooting is enough to make the team.

C- DeMarcus Cousins, 6′ 11″ 270 lbs. – Sacramento Kings

  • 14.1 PPG/ 8.6 RPG/ 2.5 APG
  • 1 season

PF- Chuck Hayes, 6′ 6″ 238 lbs. – Houston Rockets

  • 7.9 PPG/ 8.1 RPG/ 2.7 APG
  • 6 seasons

SF- Tayshaun Prince, 6′ 9″ 215 lbs. – Detroit Pistons

  • 14.1 PPG/ 4.2 RPG/ 2.8 APG
  • 9 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship

SG- Jodie Meeks, 6′ 4″ 208 lbs. – Philadelphia 76ers

  • 7.8 PPG/ 2.0 RPG/ APG .8
  • 2 seasons

PG- Rajon Rondo, 6′ 1″ 171 lbs. – Boston Celtics

  • 14.0 PPG/ 5.4 RPG/ APG 9.6
  • 5 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship
  • 2-time All-Star

6th Man- John Wall, 6′ 4″ 195 lbs. – Washington Wizards

  • 16.4 PPG/ 4.6 RPG/ 8.3 APG
  • 1 season

Teams six through one.

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5 thoughts on “Post-NCAA Tournament Part 1

  1. Pingback: Post-NCAA Tournament Part 2 « Dagoblog

  2. Pingback: Round 1 of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

  3. Pingback: Post-NCAA Tournament: Round 2 « Dagoblog

  4. Pingback: Final Four of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

  5. Pingback: Championship of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

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