Post-NCAA Tournament Part 2

Yesterday I explained that the purpose of this piece is establish what university puts out the best pros based on active players today. To solve this dilemma I have decided the best way is to establish the 12 best teams and rank them for seeding purposes using a formula you can see below.

The rankings will lead to the bracket at the bottom of the page which will allow for each round to be voted on from round one to the championship.

Now, without further adieu here is the list, starting with point values to explain.

The point system is as follows:

    1. Points per game + rebounds per game + assists per game
    2. Number of All-Star Games (3 points)
    3. NBA Championships (10 points)
    4. Number of Pro Seasons (1 point each)
    5. Regular season MVP (10 points)
    6. Finals MVP (9 points)
    7. 6th Man of the Year/Defensive Player of the Year/Rookie of the Year (7 points)
    8. Add up numbers 1-7 for player value
    9. Add up player value for team value

For example: Brandon Roy: 38.5 points

  • 12.2 PPG/ 2.6 RPG/ 2.7 APG
  • 5 seasons
  • 3-time All-Star
  • Rookie of the Year

Notes:

∏ denotes stats from 2009-10 due to injuries in 2010-11.
* denotes stats from college in 2010-11.
† denotes stats from a non-NBA league.

Numbers twelve through seven are below, then followed by six through one with explanations.

#12. Ohio State Buckeyes

#11. Syracuse Orangemen

#10. UCLA Bruins

#9. Florida Gators

#8. Texas Longhorns

#7. Kentucky Wildcats

#6. Arizona Wildcats: 183.7

A few years ago and this would have been one of the most talent-laden rosters. Now, age and injuries have decimated the Wildcat pros. Up front Channing Frye has been serviceable as a center in Phoenix with the ability to spread the floor while Jordan Hill hasn’t really lived up to expectations. Andre Iguodala is still, to me, one of the most talented and versatile small forwards in the league, and the backcourt of Mike Bibby, Gilbert Arenas and Jason Terry won’t win games on their own but can do enough to chip in. Just missing the cut was Richard Jefferson who can barely walk now and would take minutes away from Iguodala.

C-Channing Frye, 6′ 11″ 245 lbs. – Phoenix Suns

  • 12.7 PPG/ 6.7 RPG/ 1.2 APG
  • 6 seasons

PF- Jordan Hill, 6′ 10″ 235 lbs. – Houston Rockets

  • 5.6 PPG/ 4.3 RPG/ .4 APG
  • 2 seasons

SF- Andre Iguodala, 6′ 6″ 207 lbs. – Philadelphia 76ers

  • 14.1 PPG/ 5.8 RPG/ 6.3 APG
  • 7 seasons

SG- Jason Terry, 6′ 2″ 180 lbs. – Dallas Mavericks

  • 15.8 PPG/ 1.9 RPG/ 3.2 APG
  • 12 seasons
  • 6th Man of the Year
  • 1 NBA Championship

PG- Gilbert Arenas, 6′ 4″ 215 lbs. – Orlando Magic

  • 10.8 PPG/ 2.7 RPG/ 3.9 RPG
  • 10 seasons
  • 3-time All-Star

6th Man- Mike Bibby, 6′ 2″ 195 lbs. – Miami Heat

  • 8.6 PPG/ 2.4 RPG/ 3.3 APG
  • 13 seasons

#5. Kansas Jayhawks: 190.3

For such a successful college team in the past 10 years this roster is really lacking. Of course Paul Pierce still has enough in the tank to to take over games late, and Kirk Hinrich can play point and shooting guard above average but otherwise there are shortcomings. Up front the team is a little older and slower, and while he had a very nice NBA Finals this past spring, Mario Chalmers is still unproven. Missing the cut were twins Marcus and Markieff Morris, who, if there was evidence of play against NBA players could easily have made the team. Without them this is a squad that will live and die offensively by Pierce, so it might have to rely on its defense.

C- Nick Collison, 6′ 10″ 255 lbs. – Oklahoma City Thunder

  • 6.7 PPG/ 5.8 RPG/ 1.0 APG
  • 7 seasons

PF- Drew Gooden, 6′ 10″ 250 lbs. – Milwaukee Bucks

  • 11.3 PPG/ 6.8 RPG/ 1.3 APG
  • 9 seasons

SF- Paul Pierce, 6′ 7″ 235 lbs. – Boston Celtics

  • 20.8 PPG/ 5.0 RPG/ 2.8 APG
  • 13 seasons
  • Finals MVP
  • 1-time NBA Championship
  • 9-time  All-Star

SG- Kirk Hinrich, 6′ 4″ 190 lbs. – Atlanta Hawks

  • 10.2 PPG/ 2.5 RPG/ 4.0 APG
  • 8 seasons

PG- Mario Chalmers, 6′ 2″ 190 lbs. – Miami Heat

  • 6.4 PPG/ 2.1 RPG/ 2.5 APG
  • 3 seasons

6th Man- Darrell Arthur, 6′ 9″ 235 lbs. – Memphis Grizzlies

  • 9.1 PPG/ 4.3 RPG/ .7 APG
  • 3 seasons

#4. Duke Blue Devils: 196.8

For the longest time I have been a big basher on Duke and their NBA-level talent. This is not the best team on the list, but they still have a very well rounded squad starting on the front line. Elton Brand and Carlos Boozer are not the dominant players they have been in the past, but they still averaged over 15 points a game for playoff teams last year. Luol Deng is one of the more underrated small forwards in the league and on this list who is a big time difference maker. The backcourt is this teams biggest weakness with rookie Kyrie Irving running the floor and J.J. Reddick playing the two-guard.

C- Elton Brand, 6′ 9″ 254 lbs. – Philadelphia 76ers

  • 15.0 PPG/ 8.3 RPG/ 1.5 APG
  • 12 seasons
  • Rookie of the Year
  • 2-time All-Star

PF- Carlos Boozer, 6′ 9″ 266 lbs. – Chicago Bulls

  • 17.5 PPG/ 9.6 RPG/ 2.5 APG
  • 9 seasons
  • 2-time All-Star

SF- Luol Deng, 6′ 9″ 220 lbs. – Chicago Bulls

  • 17.4 PPG/ 5.8 RPG/ 2.8 APG
  • 7 seasons

SG- J.J. Reddick, 6′ 4″ 190 lbs. – Orlando Magic

  • 10.1 PPG/ 1.9 RPG/ 1.7 APG
  • 5 seasons

PG- Kyrie Irving*, 6′ 2″ 180 lbs. – Cleveland Cavaliers

  • 17.4 PPG/ 3.8 RPG/ 5.1 APG

6th Man- Shane Battier, 6′ 8″ 220 lbs. – Memphis Grizzlies

  • 7.6 PPG/ 4.5 RPG/ 2.3 APG
  • 10 seasons

#3. North Carolina Tar Heels: 214.8

This is definitely the most decrepit roster on this list. Once upon a time a team featuring Vince Carter, Antawn Jamison and Brendan Haywood could equal an NBA Championship. But now they must rely on youngsters Raymond Felton and Ty Lawson, who guided Denver to the playoffs, running the show with young up-and-comer Ed Davis coming off the bench to create match-up problems.

C- Brendan Haywood, 7′ 0″ 263 lbs. – Dallas Mavericks

  • 4.4 PPG/ 5.2 RPG/ .3 APG
  • 10 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship

PF- Antawn Jamison, 6′ 9″ 235 lbs. – Cleveland Cavaliers

  • 18.0 PPG/ 6.7 RPG/ 1.7 APG
  • 13 seasons
  • Sixth Man of the Year
  • 2-time All-Star

SF- Vince Carter, 6′ 6″ 220 lbs. – Phoenix Suns

  • 14.0 PPG/ 3.8 RPG/ 2.0 APG
  • 13 seasons
  • Rookie of the Year
  • 8-time All-Star

SG- Ty Lawson, 5′ 11″ 195 lbs. – Denver Nuggets

  • 11.7 PPG/ 2.5 RPG/ 4.7 APG
  • 2 seasons

PG- Raymond Felton, 6′ 1″ 205 lbs. – Portland Trail Blazers

  • 15.5 PPG/ 3.6 RPG/ 8.3 APG
    • 6 seasons

6th Man- Ed Davis, 6′ 10″ 215 lbs. – Toronto Raptors

  • 7.7 PPG/ 7.1 RPG/ .6 APG
  • 1 season

#2. Connecticut Huskies: 263.9

I think that UConn has the most well rounded roster on this list. They have veterans Ray Allen and Richard Hamilton who can shoot lights out along with Emeka Okafor and Caron Butler who have always been vastly underrated as pros. The biggest weakness is definitely rookie Kemba Walker who probably is a reach for the squad but is better than the alternative of Ben Gordon. The only other way a team could beat this squad is to have a strong power forward that could push around Rudy Gay and a big point guard who can control Walker on both sides of the floor.

C-Emeka Okafor, 6′ 10″ 255 lbs. – New Orleans Hornets

  • 10.3 PPG/ 9.5 RPG/ .6 APG
  • 7 seasons
  • Rookie of the Year

PF-Rudy Gay, 6′ 8″ 235 lbs. – Memphis Grizzlies

  • 19.8 PPG/ 6.2 RPG/ 2.8 APG
  • 5 seasons

SF- Caron Butler, 6′ 7″ 228 lbs. – Dallas Mavericks

  • 15.0 PPG/ 4.1 RPG/ 1.6 APG
  • 9 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship
  • 1-time  All-Star

SG- Ray Allen, 6′ 5″ 205 lbs. – Boston Celtics

  • 16.5 PPG/ 3.4 RPG/ 2.7 APG
  • 15 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship
  • 10-time All-Star

PG- Kemba Walker*, 6′ 1″ 172 lbs. – Charlotte Bobcats

  • 23.5 PPG/ 5.3 RPG/ 2.1 APG

6th Man- Richard Hamilton, 6′ 7″ 193 lbs. – Detroit Pistons

  • 14.1 PPG/ 2.3 RPG/ 3.1 APG
  • 12 seasons
  • 1 NBA Championship
  • 3-time All-Star

#1. Wake Forest: 273.9

The number one ranked team according to point values is Tim Duncan and Chris Paul followed by a whole bunch of question marks. Duncan’s point total alone is the reason they are this high, but it is hard to overvalue a team that has two of the best players at their respective positions on the floor. After them, Josh Howard is a liability while James Johnson and Al Farouq-Aminu are unknown quantities. Backup point guard Jeff Teague made huge strides last year and could be able to slide into the shooting guard position if need be.

C- Tim Duncan, 6′ 11″ 255 lbs. – San Antonio Spurs

  • 13.4 PPG/ 8.9 RPG/ 2.7 APG
  • 14 seasons
  • 4-time NBA Champion
  • 3-time Finals MVP
  • 2-time MVP
  • Rookie of the Year
  • 13-time All-Star

PF- James Johnson, 6′ 9″ 245 lbs. – Toronto Raptors

  • 7.1 PPG/ 3.7 RPG/ 2.3 APG
  • 2 seasons

SF- Al Farouq-Aminu, 6′ 9″ 215 lbs. – Los Angeles Clippers

  • 5.6 PPG/ 3.3 RPG/ .7 APG
  • 1 season

SG- Josh Howard, 6′ 7″ 210 lbs. – Washington Wizards

  • 8.4 PPG/ 4.1 RPG/ 1.3 APG
  • 8 seasons
  • 1-time All-Star

PG- Chris Paul, 6′ 0″ 175 lbs. – New Orleans Hornets

  • 15.8 PPG/ 4.1 RPG/ 9.8 APG
  • 6 seasons
  • Rookie of the Year
  • 4-time All-Star

6th Man- Jeff Teague, 6′ 2″ 180 lbs. – Atlanta Hawks

  • 5.2 PPG/ 1.5 RPG/ 2.0 APG
  • 2 seasons

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5 thoughts on “Post-NCAA Tournament Part 2

  1. Pingback: Post-NCAA Tournament Part 1 « Dagoblog

  2. Pingback: Round 1 of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

  3. Pingback: Post-NCAA Tournament: Round 2 « Dagoblog

  4. Pingback: Final Four of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

  5. Pingback: Championship of the Post-NCAA Tournament « Dagoblog

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